Essential fats: how do they affect growth and development of infants and young children in developing countries? A literature review.

Omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids, particularly docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), are known to play an essential role in the development of the brain and retina. Intakes in pregnancy and early life affect growth and cognitive performance later in childhood. However, total fat intake, alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) and DHA intakes are often low among pregnant and lactating women, infants and young children in developing countries. As breast milk is one of the best sources of ALA and DHA, breastfed infants are less likely to be at risk of insufficient intakes than those not breastfed. Enhancing intake of ALA through plant food products (soy beans and oil, canola oil, and foods containing these products such as lipid-based nutrient supplements) has been shown to be feasible. However, because of the low conversion rates of ALA to DHA, it may be more efficient to increase DHA status through increasing fish consumption or DHA fortification, but these approaches may be more costly. In addition, breastfeeding up to 2 years and beyond is recommended to ensure an adequate essential fat intake in early life. Data from developing countries have shown that a higher omega-3 fatty acid intake or supplementation during pregnancy may result in small improvements in birthweight, length and gestational age based on two randomized controlled trials and one cross-sectional study. More rigorous randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm this effect. Limited data from developing countries suggest that ALA or DHA supplementation during lactation and in infants may be beneficial for growth and development of young children 6-24 months of age in these settings. These benefits are more pronounced in undernourished children. However, there is no evidence for improvements in growth following omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in children >2 years of age.

和訳
「必須脂肪酸:それらは発展途上国における乳幼児の成長と発達にどのように影響を与えるのだろうか?文献レビュー」

ω-3およびω-6脂肪酸、特にドコサヘキサエン酸(DHA)は、脳および網膜の発達に重要な役割を果たすことが知られている。妊娠中および誕生後早い段階での摂取量は、幼児期後期の成長と認知能力に影響を与える。しかし、総脂肪摂取量、α-リノレン酸(ALA)およびDHAの摂取量は、発展途上国の妊娠中および授乳中の女性、ならびに乳幼児では多くの場合低い。母乳は最高のALAおよびDHA源の一つであるので、母乳で育てられた乳児は、そうでない乳児よりも摂取不足のリスクさらされる可能性は低い。植物性食品(大豆および大豆油、キャノーラ油、および脂質ベースの栄養補助食品等のこれらの製品を含む食品)を介してALAの摂取を増加させることは、可能であることが示されている。しかし、ALAの低いDHA変換率のために、魚類摂取の増加、またはDHA強化によりDHA状態を増加させる方がより効率的であり得るが、これらのアプローチはより高価である可能性がある。また、2歳またはそれ以降まで母乳で育てることが、誕生後早い段階における必須脂肪酸の摂取を確実にするために推奨されている。発展途上国からのデータは、妊娠中のω-3脂肪酸の高摂取または補給は、出生時の体重、身長、在胎期間のわずかな改善をもたらす可能性があることを、2件の無作為化比較試験と1件の横断的研究に基づいて示した。この効果を確認するためには、より厳密な無作為化比較試験が必要とされる。発展途上国からの限られたデータは、授乳中および乳児におけるALAまたはDHA補給が、これらの条件での6~24カ月齢の乳幼児の成長と発達に有益であることを示唆している。これらの利益は、栄養不良の子どもたちでより明白である。しかし、2歳超の子供におけるω-3脂肪酸補給後の成長改善の証拠はない。

このページの先頭へ戻る